Classes

Descriptions of the different arts offered at MTPMA.

 

Judo.

Created by Jigoro Kano in 1882, judo is a soft art that emphasizes mutual benefit and welfare.  Judo is also an Olympic spot identified by the throws , hold downs, chokes, and arm bars to win a match.  Taught by Brian Mills.

Jujutsu. (traditional)

The base art for many of the Japanese martial arts, this Jujutsu(spelled differently to identify the traditional or old style) is a battle field art of self defense.  As taught at Mt Pleasant Martial Arts it includes arm locks, take downs, submissions, throws, chokes, pressure points, weapons, and mental training.  Taught by Brian Mills.

Systema.

This Russian style of martial art dates back to the 10th century.  Systema is a style that combines strong spirit with extremely innovative and versatile tactics that are at the same time practical, deadly, and effective against any type of enemy under any circumstances. The style is natural and free while having no strict rules, rigid structure or limitations.  When the Communists came to power in 1917, they originally reserved it just for a few Special Operations Units.  Taught by C.J. Rafferty

Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ)  

A grappling-based martial art whose central theme is the skill of controlling a resisting opponent in ways that force him to submit. Due to the fact that control is generally easier on the ground than in a standing position, much of the technique of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ) is centered round the skill of taking an opponent down to the ground and wrestling for dominant control positions from where the opponent can be rendered harmless. 

Striking/MMA.

MMA is a very vague term, the mix of boxing, BJJ,  judo, karate, and muy thai in the Saturday striking class is a perfect storm of techniques and training.  This class is very aerobic with technical aspects on how to avoid being hit as much or as hard as you are hitting your opponent. 

Muay Thai.

Referred to as the “Art of Eight Limbs” or the “Science of Eight Limbs”, because it makes use of punches, kicks, elbows and knee strikes, thus using eight “points of contact”, as opposed to “two points” (fists) in boxing and “four points” (hands and feet) used in other more regulated combat sports, such as kickboxing and savate.  A practitioner of muay Thai is known as a nak muay. Western practitioners are sometimes called Nak Muay Farang, meaning “foreign boxer.”     Attributed to Wikipedia